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In quest of divine intervention

In an unprecedented move for sustainable peace in Manipur, women in large number started lying on a bare road in Churachandpur, Manipur donning sack on Thursday. They lost 8 people in the recent orgy of violence which erupted after the assembly passed three controversial bills. Notably, women in this restive north eastern state have been raising voices against injustice, rights violations and all adds for the last many years.

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On A Winter’s Morning / Eti Sitar Puwat

12 Jun 2019 - 11:17pm | Arati Barua

My poem " eti sitar puwat" got published in Assam Bani on 31st May, 2019 edition.

Here's the translation of the poem as the friends here wanted it it english as they cant read Assamese.

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On A Winter’s Morning

On a winter’s morning…
While sitting on our porch…
I wondered…
How I wish I was with my Granma…
Together we could sway in the winds…
Walk in the snow…
And just wander around…

On a winter’s morning…
While sitting on our porch…
I wondered…
If I could fly at the heart of the blue sky…
Where the dark clouds shadow the lands…
Where the lightning sparks the brightest…
Stars that play with each other…
But still being under the sky…
Listening to the melodies…
Of the nightingales and sparrows…

On a winter’s morning…
While sitting on our porch…
I wondered…
I‘ll sleep on my Granma’s lap…
While we talk about the strangest…
And then get lost in dreams…
From where perhaps I never return…

___

Translation by Imon Kalyan Barua
For Arati Barua’s “Eti Sitar Puwat”
Pub on 31st May 2019 in Assam Bani.

 

Photos telling the tales of harsh reality

4 Aug 2011 - 1:29pm | Abdul Gani


There are several insurgent groups in the northeast and everybody is aware of that. It is also known to all that every now and then troops of security forces are employed in this land to counter them. But then there are some tales of harsh reality those never come to light. There are several instances where a single bullet might have changed the fate of a family.


Come to the MF Hussain Gallery at the Jamia Millia Islamia campus in New Delhi, an exhibition featuring the snaps telling thousand words of harsh reality from the state of Assam and Nagaland are being displayed.


If there was a mother who saw her 12 year old son shot down in front of her eyes there were instances where kids became orphans and there were even some who escaped the death only to realize that their lives were more horrible to be alive with the ever increasing agony of the lost beloved ones during the decade long bloody movements.


The photographs taken by Kausiki Sarma during her study on Impact of the Armed Conflict in Assam and Nagaland in the region portrays the reality of the region.


“The study was conducted to map the impact of the conflicts on local people in both states that revolved around campaigns for ‘sovereignty’ by various armed groups. And the photographs displayed here is the reality,” Kausiki Sarma said adding that the photographs were shot across the three districts of Kokrajhar, Dhemaji and Sivasagar in Assam and three districts in Nagaland namely Peren, Kohima and Tuensang.


“In the course of travels for this project we met many women whose lives have been changed irrevocably by the decades of violence that had gripped the states. Each family, each woman had stories of personal loss and bereavement, of physical and emotional trauma,” she said.


She also expressed her sorrow that the real tales are still not known to the outside world. “For many of the victims it was the first time anyone from another part of India had visited their villages, sat among them and listened to their tales,” she said.


“These are stories that the world does not know and has not even cared to know,” she said adding, “I just make an attempt to make an honest portrayal of their stories through my lenses.”


Kausiki was born and brought up in Assam. She completed her Bachelors in Statistics and Masters in Operational Research from the University of Delhi. Kausiki has been traveling all over the North-East and photographing for several years.


Nagaland villagers advocate for Sustainable Development

20 Apr 2013 - 4:10pm | Amarjyoti Borah

Despite seeing development in terms of infrastructure and vehicles in the oil rich districts of Sibsagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia in neighbouring Assam, the villagers of Nagaland seem unmoved over the lack of development in their own state.

The Wokha district in Nagaland, is a oil rich district but however development till date couldn’t actually take place as a result of public protest and also protests by different organizations.

“The system of ownership over land and resources is different in Nagaland, and here its not owned by a single individual but by the community as a whole, and to do any activity such as oil exploration, the community as a whole must give the consent,” said Manisha Medhi, a research scholar based in Assam.

“Even the person beneath whose land the oil or any other natural resource is found doesn’t have the sole right or authority over the resource, but will rest on the entire community,” said Medhi.

 Several senior residents of the Wokha district, when approached however said that they are happy with things as it is, and added that they are not much pained in seeing developments in the oil rich areas  in the neighbouring state.

 “There has been some development in areas such as Sibsagar in Assam, but it is not at all uniform and not decentralized. Only some selective people have gained, and most poor people basically the farmers, have suffered to a great extent,” said Nyanbemo Ngullie, a senior leader of the Lotha tribe, which is a strong force in Wokha where the oil fields are located.

The Lotha leader, who had once championed the fight against oil giants ONGC, said that he and everyone at Wokha is voicing for sustainable development to bring benefits for everyone.

“I have myself visited the developed districts in Assam and have witnessed the developmental scenario there. The benefits of the developmental activities have gone only to some individual and also to one section of the society, but overall we can’t call that development,” said Ngullie.

A study carried out under a media fellowship offered by the National Foundation for India (NFI) shows that though the Wokha district in Nagaland, and the Sibsagar, Dibrugarh and Tinsukia districts in Assam are oil rich, the people are a whole are yet to benefit from the natural resources.