Skip to content Skip to navigation

D Day for Piano Kids

GUWAHATI:            The State’s leading music institute Piano Kids celebrated its sixth anniversary with an evening of exhilarating piano music performed by a group of talented youngsters in chic costumes at the Pragjyoti Cultural Complex, Machkhowa, Guwahati, on April 6. The combined musical energy of these kids truly lived up to the expectations and interests among music aficionados. The musical programme, designed and directed by renowned piano maestro Kushal Krishna Dev Goswami, was titled ‘Night Of The Little Pianists 2018’.
            After a welcome speech by Dr Pradip Mahanta, the president of the working committee, the evening kicked off with the devotional tune – ‘Muktito nispriha jitu’, composed by Srimanta Sankardeva and Madhabdev, rendered and set to music by the students of the institute. As has been a tradition, Piano Kids showcased music that encompassed several genres, and the students with their sustained and focused learning, played them with admirable ease, making the evening a feast for music lovers and enthusiasts. 
            The institute continues to nurture and develop Assamese classics with timeless western and contemporary compositions in all its varied forms. Apart from integrating western compositions, ballads and folk music from all over the world, reflecting a wide variety of musical influences, Kushal Krishna Dev Goswami has been assiduously working towards preserving, promoting and revitalising Assamese traditional songs, including the Borgeets, the tunes of the Kirtan Ghosha and Naamghosha, Oja Pali, Zikir and Jaris, by converting them into the staff notation. It has been central to his pioneering and acclaimed work in piano music, and which in turn, has provided a wonderful structure for the young and upcoming pianists to not only just learn and practice, but broaden their horizons, in a collective musical environment. “It has always been my vision to incorporate many of our traditional folk songs to the staff notation”, said Dev Goswami, after being felicitated by the organising committee, comprising mostly of guardians of the students. He also felt that these traditional Assamese songs needed to be disseminated elsewhere in the country and even abroad. It has been a challenge for him shepherding a whole bunch of youngsters, who went through rigorous hours of training in preparation for the big occasion.
            The evening proceeded with the students displaying their prowess and energy in a number of musical numbers comprising of the familiar lullaby ‘Aamaare moina xubo ye..’, ‘We shall overcome’, which was once a key anthem of the African American civil rights movement in the Fifties and Sixties, legendary artiste Dr Bhupen Hazarika’s immortal ‘Bistirno paarore..’, Kalaguru Bishnuprasad Rabha’s ‘Naahor phule nuxuwaai..’, Australian composer Katherine Faith’s ‘Swans on the Lake’, French musician George Biscof’s ‘Morning greetings’, ‘Maa aami Sadiyale jaamei’ – an evergreen number written by lyricist Keshav Mahanta and rendered by Khagen Mahanta, Kishore Kumar’s popular Hindi song ‘Ahh Chal Ke Tuje..’ from the film ‘Door Gagan Ki Chaon Main’, Jayanta Hazarika’s evergreen song ‘Mayamoi rupali jonak..’, and finally, what was certainly the highlight of the evening, a Bihu performance played on a track, which had been converted to staff notation for the first time by Goswami. Weaving a tapestry around Assamese, Boro, Seraa, Mishing and Tiwa Bihu, the group players engaged the audience with their dexterous movements, playing in perfect harmony. Goswami selected the track after going through a lot of research work, listening and collecting traditional tunes and cataloguing them before laying out the notations. It has certainly left everyone in the audiences with a greater sense of appreciation for the enormous amount of work and creativity that the maestro has endeavoured to accomplish.
            The evening also witnessed the felicitation of renowned music director of Assamese cinema Ramen Baruah, who graced the occasion as the chief guest. “The group playing is beautifully synchronised and disciplined, and the credit goes to Goswami for instilling such confidence in his students,” said Baruah. The organisers also felicitated Pronoy Bordoloi, executive editor, Prag News and Gita Dutta, Principal of Shrimanta Shankar Academy. The programme was nicely compered by Roonjyoti Hazarika Bora and Papori Saikia Dowerah.

Author info

Prantik Deka's picture

Prantik Deka. Email: prantikdeka@gmail.com

Add new comment

Republish

Republish this content

Sarkar leaves CM residence

9 Mar 2018 - 10:29am | AT News

PRASENJIT SAHA
AGARTALA: In a rare scene in Indian politics, Manik Sarkar vacated his official residence in Agartala where he housed for 20 years as Tripura Chief minister.

Sarkar, who list his hot seat following his party’s humiliating defeat in the recent assembly polls came out of the building on Thursday along with his wife and straightly went to the party office since he has no house of his own.

For the next couple of weeks, Sarkar and his wife will stay in the party office. “His wife booked a flat in the city which is hearing completion. By April the flat would be ready for the Sarkar's,” said a party leader in Agartala.

Batting some books, new clothes and CDs, the couple have not taken away when they left they building twenty years after they started residing.

Rijiju opposes mega dams

18 Oct 2014 - 8:05am | AT News

Amid the undying controversy and stiff oppostion against the NHPC-owned mega dam at Gerukamukh, Union minister of state for home Kiren Rijiju said that he supported small dams in the north east to generate power.

Addressing a conclave on PHDCI conclave in Guwahati on Friday, Rijiju said that he was in favour of dams of maximum 500mw capacity.

Rijiju disclosed that NHPC had lost Rs 7000 crore only because of the stalemate over the controversial mega dam at Gerukamukh.

All about homemade fluoride filter

2 Jun 2017 - 10:13pm | Chandan Kumar Duarah

Dengaon is a beautiful area consists green hills, plains and rivers in Brahmaputr a valley. More than 50 villages and most of its inhabitants are belong to Karbi tribe. This area in border of Nagoan and Karbi Anglong districts in Assam are highly and dangerously fluoride-affected in Brahmaputra valley.

The presence of excess amount of fluoride was tested in the water from rivers, ponds, wells, tube-well and deep-wells. Villagers have been suffering from fluoride for centuries which was detected in last decade. There are no drinking water supply facilities in remote villages which are not easily accessible. Symptoms of excess fluoride induced disorders are prevalent some states of the country including Brahmaputra valley. Karbi Anglong and Hojai districts are the most fluoride-affected districts in Assam.

Fluoride has been an invisible enemy contains in drinking water as chemical contaminant mostly in ground water in Brahmaputra valley. It has been a matter of grave concern that almost all districts in Assam are fluoride and arsenic affected. Villagers from different tribes and communities have been witnessing this demon with dental and skeletal flourosis. A small amount of fluoride is good for health but excess flouride of drinking water causes various health problems including damage of tooth and bone. Fluoride is a deadly poison. A long term ingestion of fluoride in drinking water and cooking water causes to other health problems. Affected villagers had no option to minimize the presence of fluoride and only some families use to drink filtered water. Moreover, general filter cannot remove or minimize fluoride.

Fortunately villagers have found a new low-cost technology to remove fluoride and iron from water recently. Now villagers are using this fluoride filter unit to have fluoride-free water. Villagers have installed Fluoride Nilogon - a low-cost and simple method for removal of fluoride from contaminated groundwater. Fluoride Nilogon is a method for removal of excess fluoride from contaminated groundwater for drinking purpose through phosphoric acid and crushed limestone treatment based on precipitation-absorption developed by a team of researchers led by Dr R K Dutta from Tezpur University, a central university in Assam. The name was coined from fluoride and Nilogon is an Assamese equivalent of 'removal' in English.

The method removes fluoride efficiently and selectively without leaving any toxic residual in the water at a recurring cost of ₹ 1 per 100 liter of water. The Fluoride Nilogon system can be custom designed to meet the requirements of the users ranging from small household to community. It uses a crushed limestone fixed-bed reactor where the water is treated for 3 hours in presence of a small quantity (0.00067 M) of phosphoric acid.


Bhabesh Bhagwati, a local social worker who is in charge of the unit installed near Dengaon Higher Secondary School said, " For small communities like school a 200 or 500 litre plastic drum can be used as the reactor and another 200 litre drum can be used as the sand gravel filter. After filling with crushed limestone, a 200 liter drum can be hold about 88 litre and a 500 litre drum can hold about 220 litre of water. The filter shuld have a 15-20 cm layer of small 2-3 cm size gravels, at the bottom, covered by a thin porous cloth, above which, there should be a 50-60 cm thick layer of clean medium size sand. People have been collecting water from a community unit set up near Dengaon Higher Secondary School for a year which was set up experimentally first.

After long sufferings and government negligence people of some villages of Dengaon region in Karbi Anglong districts have choosed to use "Fluoride Nilogon" unit to get fluoride-free water. "In Fluoride Nilogon, the flouride containing water, mixed with a small quantity of phosphoric acid, is put into a crushed limestone bed plug-flow reactor and kept for a residence time of at least three hour. Fluoride is removed in the reactor. The water is filtered using a sand-gravel filter after three hours" - Dr R K Dutta said.

The Flouride Nilogon method has been developed by a group of researchers lead by Dr. R K Dutta in the Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University. Flouride Nilogon removes the excess fluoride retaining only a small amount of fluoride (0.7 ppm) require for a good health. The treatment water does not contain any residual chemical added from outside. Its pH is about 7.5 which is very safe for drinking. However, the treated water should be consumed only after booiling.

Families can use a Fluoride Nilogon unit with arrangement of minimum two big size buckets as water from upper bucket can come to lower bucket using a tap. It must be sure that the tap of the upper 40 liter bucket which contain crushed limestone container is closed. 15 liter of water is added in the bucket. Then 7 ml of the dilute phosphoric acid solution be added to it and mix. Then the amount of acid solution mixed water poured in the first bucket containing crushed limestone and let it for at least three hours. In a 30 liter crushed limestone bucket, 11 liter water can be treated and and 55.2 ml phosphoric acid has to be added. There is no harm if you leave it like that for longer time even for a day. Fluoride is removed here along with neutralization of the acid. Now water can be filtered using the sand gravel filter in second lower bucket.

A household unit used by common people consists of a plastic bucket of 40 litre capacity for the reactor and another 20 litre bucket for the sand-gravel filter. Both buckets are fitted with a plastic tap each towards the bottom. The 40 litre treatment bucket is kept at a level above the filter. The 40 litre bucket is filled with crushed limestone of 0.1 to 1.5 cm size. This limestone-filled bucket can hold about 15 litre of water. The filter should have an 8-10 cm thick layer of small 2-3 cm size gravel layer at the bottom. The rest of the bucket should be thin porous cloth between the sand and the gravel layer to stop sand from going to the gravel layer.

Families from Dengaon area acknowledged benefits of Fluoride Nilogon to get fluoride-free water. Some people are using water from community set up and some have installed their own set up inside their house. The solution used in the method is a dilute solution (8.5%) of an acid even though it is a weak acid, it shoul be kept carefully. It should be kept away from children. with water in case of its contact with hand, skin or eye.

It is a simple efficient and low-cost method of removing excess fluoride from water. It this method crushed limestone is used along with a very small amount of a solution of a weak acid called phosphoric acid. The use of phosphoric acid in water purification is safe. Phosphoric acid is used in packaged food and soft drinks like Pepsi.